Spot Leukaemia

We may be living in uncertain times, but there is one thing we are certain of: awareness of leukaemia needs to be dramatically improved

Each year we reach millions of people with our spot leukaemia campaign but despite our efforts, awareness of blood cancer amongst the public, as well as in primary healthcare, is still dangerously low and blood cancer continues to claim more lives than prostate or breast cancer every year.

Currently, patients with leukaemia have a significantly higher rate of emergency diagnosis than other forms of cancer. The highest emergency presentation rates for any cancer type occur in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), at 66% of patients. This is a huge difference when compared with the overall cancer emergency presentation percentage (21%).

Unfortunately many people aren’t aware of the signs and symptoms of leukaemia until they or someone they know is diagnosed. This leads to a delay in visiting a GP, which can delay a diagnosis, worsening the outcomes for patients.

Quite often, due to the non-specific nature of the symptoms and relative rarity of leukaemia, people are misdiagnosed by their GP or attend several times before diagnosis. This means that there is a delay at primary healthcare. 

We need your help in reaching the general public so that everyone is able to Spot Leukaemia sooner. 

Early diagnosis saves lives

What we’re doing to help you to Spot Leukaemia?

Last year, our Spot Leukaemia campaign reached over 100 million people, and this year we want to reach even more, so that there is a greater awareness of the clusters of symptoms that could indicate a blood cancer.

This September, we plan to:

  1. Raise awareness online and within the media of the signs and symptoms of leukaemia, educating the public so they know what to look out for.
  2. Share leukaemia stories so that blood cancer patients can connect to someone who is going through the same journey as them and the public can gain a better understanding of leukaemia, how it presents and who it affects.

Read some amazing stories here.

  1. Raise awareness across the world – World Leukemia Day 2020 is launching on 4th September. By getting people from all over the world to participate in sharing on social media we plan to raise awareness of leukaemia in everyone. #WLD20 #worldleukemiaday

Spot the signs and symptoms of leukaemia

Leukaemia can be hard to spot because the signs and symptoms are common to other unrelated illnesses. Knowing what to look out for could help you make the decision to visit your GP sooner. Early diagnosis saves lives.

The six most common symptoms experienced by all leukaemia patients prior to diagnosis. These are:

  1. Fatigue
  2. Shortness of breath
  3. Fever or night sweats
  4. Bruising or bleeding
  5. Bone/joint pain
  6. Repeated infections

Learn about the signs and symptoms of leukaemia

How can you get involved with our Spot Leukaemia campaign?

1. Post on social media about our campaign, share our resources or share stories with the hashtag #SpotLeukaemia. Help raise awareness of the symptoms of leukemia by using our social media graphics and sharing these across your social media platforms.

You can download all our resources here.

2. Put on your spotty clothes to share the importance of knowing how to ‘spot’ the signs and symptoms of leukemia. Share your ‘spotty selfie’ on social media with the hashtag #spotleukaemia during blood cancer awareness month this September.

3. Take part in World Leukemia Day on the 4th September on social media with the hashtags #WLD20 #worldleukemiaday, Help raise awareness of the symptoms of leukaemia by using our social media graphics and sharing these across your social media platforms.

Find out more about World Leukemia Day here.

Download the World Leukemia Day resources here.

If you have any further questions about Spot Leukaemia then you can contact our Campaigns and Advocacy team. They are available Monday to Friday from 9:00am – 5:30pm. If you would like to speak to them, you can send them an email at campaigns@leukaemiacare.org.uk