Leukaemia: I wasn’t born yesterday

As part of our report, we undertook a survey of over 1,300 leukaemia patients, to uncover the inequalities that are impacting on cancer survival and patient experience.

What’s the problem?

Research from sources such as Macmillan and Public Health England has shown that cancer survival worsens with increasing age. Older patients (those aged 65 and over) make up just under two thirds of all leukaemia cases (64%). However, this group accounts for 81% of all leukaemia related deaths.

Our new report ‘Leukaemia: I wasn’t born yesterday’ looks at the challenges faced by older patients and makes recommendations for improvements.

You can download our report here

What this means for patients

As part of our report, we undertook a survey of over 1,300 leukaemia patients, to uncover the inequalities that are impacting on cancer survival and patient experience.

Case studies

Ann Fox (chronic myeloid leukaemia patient)

Ann was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in 2010 and was immediately placed on the Spirit 2 Trial. After her discharge from hospital, Ann struggled with loneliness before discovering a local CML support group.

Read her story here.

Bridget (chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patient)

76-year-old Bridget was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) in 2009 and was put on watch and wait. Bridget is now able to start treatment, but she is worried it will make her unable to care for her husband, and is finding it difficult to get her consultant to understand her situation.Read on for her story.

Read her story here.

Graham Mason (acute myeloid leukaemia patient)

72-year-old Graham was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in 2003. However, it wasn’t a doctor who diagnosed him, but a dentist.

Read his story here.

Kenneth Redman (chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patient)

Kenneth was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) in 2011 at the age of 74. He has received excellent support during treatment, but has struggled with the financial impact.

Read more of Kenneth’s story here.

Stuart Northage (chronic myeloid leukaemia patient)

67-year-old Stuart was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in 2004. However, his diagnosis meant that he was forced to retire early.

Read on for more of his here.

Frank (chronic myeloid leukaemia patient)

64-year-old Frank was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in 2010. Frank didn’t know much about leukaemia, and didn’t receive much information and support until he was assigned a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

Read his story here.

Based on what you told us, we have made the following recommendations:

  • Improved awareness of the signs and symptoms of leukaemia, amongst the public and healthcare professionals, including the link between leukaemia and age
  • Access to a clinical nurse specialist from diagnosis onwards for all patients
  • Tailored information and support for patients, based on their individual need, not age. This should include guidance on finding accurate information online
  • Equal access to clinical trials for patients of all ages, to ensure that robust evidence is available on the most appropriate treatment

What can you do to help?

1. Download a copy of the report (PDF)

2. Share the report on social media to help spread the word

3. If you’re aged 65 and over and have been affected by leukaemia, get in touch with us to share your story by emailing advocacy@leukaemiacare.org.uk or calling 01905 755977

4. Keep up to date with our campaigns by signing up to receive email communications from LC.